The Truth About the Zika Virus: Jon Rappoport on The Corbett Report

By James Corbett

You may have heard of the wave of birth defects that is ravaging Latin America as the globe gears up for another pandemic panic. But do you know how many of those cases of microcephaly have been confirmed? Or how many of those confirmed cases are said to be “related to” the Zika virus? Today Jon Rappaport of NoMoreFakeNews.com joins us to separate the truth from the hype with the Zika virus panic and discuss whether the WHO and the CDC are merely crying wolf yet again.



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  • John Cook

    They are getting the sheeple scared of a harmless virus for some reason. I
    don’t know yet what that reason is – but we will soon find out I expect.
    Fear is a strong motivator, I’m curious what they want the sheeple motivated
    to endure. Some loss of freedom probably.

    • Conquered people naturally resent their imposed government and the taxation and other insults that it foists on them. Such resentful people easily become restive; should a promising opportunity to throw off the oppressor’s dominion present itself, they may seize it. Even if they mount no rebellion or overt resistance, however, they quietly strive to avoid their rulers’ exactions and to sabotage their rulers’ apparatus of government. As Machiavelli observes, the conqueror “who does not manage this matter well, will soon lose whatever he has gained, and while he retains it will find in it endless troubles and annoyances” (1513). For the stationary bandits, force alone proves a very costly resource for keeping people in the mood to generate a substantial, steady stream of tribute.
      Sooner or later, therefore, every government augments the power of its sword with the power of its priesthood, forging an iron union of throne and altar. In olden times, not uncommonly, the rulers were themselves declared to be gods – the Pharaohs of ancient Egypt made this claim for many centuries. Now the subjects can be brought to fear not only by the ruler’s superior force, but also by his supernatural powers. Moreover, if people believe in an afterlife, where the pain and sorrows of this life may be sloughed off, the priests hold a privileged position in prescribing the sort of behavior in the here and now that best serves one’s interest in securing a blessed situation in the life to come.
      Thus, the warrior element of government puts the people in fear for their lives, and the priestly element puts them in fear for their eternal souls. These two fears compose a powerful compound – sufficient to prop up governments everywhere on earth for several millennia.
      The religious grounds for submission to the ruler-gods gradually transmogrified into notions of nationalism and popular duty, culminating eventually in the curious idea that under a democratic system of government, the people themselves are the government, and hence whatever it requires them to do, they are really doing for themselves – as Woodrow Wilson had the cheek to declare when he proclaimed military conscription backed by severe criminal sanctions in 1917, “it is in no sense a conscription of the unwilling : it is, rather, selection from a nation which has volunteered in mass”.

      The Political Economy of Fear
      Fear, like every other “productive” resource, is subject to the laws of production. Thus, it cannot escape the law of diminishing marginal productivity : as successive doses of fear-mongering are added to the government’s “production” process, the incremental public clamor for governmental protection declines. The first time the government cries wolf, the public is frightened; the second time, less so; the third time, still less so. If the government plays the fear card too much, it overloads the public’s sensibilities, and eventually people discount almost entirely the government’s attempts to frighten them further.

      From :
      Fear : The Foundation of Every Government’s Power
      by Robert Higgs, 2005

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