Human Brains Can Be “Modified” Using Lasers: Scientists

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Nicholas West
Activist Post

The race to decode the brain continues, and quickens by the day. A wild array of new possibilities are opening in the field of mind control. The mind control of the future bypasses the indirect methods of changing perception through media and politics, or even mind-altering drugs. The mind control of the future goes straight into direct programming and rewiring of the human brain.

There is an obsession with finding new ways to access and manipulate what is believed to be the seat of human behavior. The spate of new developments, which now seem to come almost daily, can be attributed to the large commitment made by the U.S. BRAIN project and its much larger European counterpart the Human Brain Project. All told, billions are being spent to unlock what neuroscientists see as the final frontier.

So far, some of the more potentially dangerous elements have centered around wirelessly remote controlling brain activity via ultrasound, as was the intention of a secret DARPA program going on at Arizona State University that was exposed by a whistleblower. Ongoing experiments with implanting, erasing and altering memories are showing promise in lab animals.

Now, scientists believe they have found a brand new tool to access the brain and modify it directly: high-powered lasers.

Whereas the above-mentioned research is showing promise in lab animals, it does remain officially theoretical at this point as to how effective it will be on humans. However, tests using high-powered lasers to target “trouble zones” in the brain are being trumpeted by scientists as “perfected” in human trials.


The futurist website Extreme Tech in their article, “Radical human brain modification using high-powered lasers has been perfected,” can’t avoid citing science fiction in its description of this new fiber optic laser technology conducted through robotics:

15 Watts of liquid-cooled, catheterized laser persuasion. When mated to a ROSA medical robot, this device makes the brain-fixer mech from Ender’s Game look downright primitive. Even the most stubborn neurons will be conformed. It’s not just the laser that makes this new medical virtuosity the experience of a lifetime, it’s the unreal, futuristic technology pipeline that now awaits.

Initial trials have begun with epileptics, certainly a noble enough starting point in attempting to eradicate a truly debilitating condition. With tongue in cheek – though we ARE talking about real tests here – Extreme Tech goes on to describe some of the benefits of this new technology, while also exposing the risks of the ultrasound approach touted thusfar:

The whole point of the laser concept is to avoid the gross tissue damage you would otherwise get with brute force approaches. Typically this would entail either scooping out brain in small ice cream-like dollops, or melting it with ultrasonics or perhaps an indiscriminate RF-emitting antenna. In order to avoid inflicting the same kind of trauma with an errant heat wand, the surgeons have come up with a solution extraordinaire. (emphasis added).

I’ve read a lot of the research papers covering the use of ultrasound in mind research and this is the first I’m hearing of brain melt as a possible outcome. Probably not something that is likely to be featured in a press release.

The mechanics of the high-powered laser itself is incredibly dry, technical reading, but suffice to say the human tests were conclusive:

The proof for the effectiveness of the operation came after many months of post-surgical follow-up. Almost all the trial patients had significant improvements, with most of them reporting complete seizure elimination. That is quite remarkable considering they were all drawn from a pool of severely affected individuals for whom drugs had little or no beneficial effect.

As for ethics? Here we get another glimpse of how the current establishment protocol operates, completely abandoning the precautionary principle, but just plowing headlong into the most sensitive areas of inner space:

Ayden Jacob, bioethicist and editor of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine & Radiation Therapy for a brief comment. He noted: “This advancement in the field of neurosurgery is momentous in that it offers an extraordinary synthesis of discrete domains of science to heal patients suffering from diseases in the most complex organ in the universe.

Innovation in neurosurgery will always run the risk of adverse events in a patient cohort, but the possible improvements in the quality of life for patients justifies the risks neurosurgeons are taking to develop enhanced therapeutics.”  (emphasis added)

Like many other examples of scientific tinkering, we really won’t know if the risk was justified … until it is proven that it wasn’t. Were nuclear weapons tests justified? Bioweapons? Geogenineering? GMO and its attendant pesticide overload? Nanotech materials in clothing and food? There are many other examples of promises left distorted.

For now, one has to submit to this type of procedure, but it’s not much of a stretch to imagine remote applications, just as ultrasound has moved from having to wear a physical apparatus to receiving input from properly directed frequencies. The complete failure to address worst-case scenarios is a hallmark of modern science – especially in the area of the human mind, which has been all-too closely aligned with stated goals of the military-pharmaceutical-industrial complex. It is paramount that we embrace the wonders of science, but to maintain a healthy skepticism of who is in charge and what their true goals really are.

As for the truly well meaning? There is a reason why most science fiction is written to offer a cautionary tale of where even the best intentions can lead.

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  • Isabella Key

    Honestly, I have Misophonia. I would pay anything to do something like this to me… Only for medical reasons, of course. It could be considered as ”evil”, but in many ways it could be something good and revolucionary. Thanks you.

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