The 3.2 million-year-old fossilised foot bone that proves when man first started to walk

David Derbyshire
Daily Mail

It was a small step for an apeman, but a giant leap for mankind.

Scientists have pinpointed the moment when our ancestors finally abandoned the trees to walk upright like modern people.

In a breakthrough that helps rewrite human evolution, researchers have found a fossilised foot bone from an early human relative who strolled confidently on two legs more than 3.2million years ago.

The finding ends decades of debate about when our ancestors first began to walk like modern man, rather than clambering around the trees like gorillas and chimps.

The bone belonged to Australopithecus afarensis – a creature best known from the discovery of ‘Lucy’, whose partial skeleton was dug up in Ethiopia in 1974.

Read Full Article


Activist Post Daily Newsletter

Subscription is FREE and CONFIDENTIAL
Free Report: How To Survive The Job Automation Apocalypse with subscription

Be the first to comment on "The 3.2 million-year-old fossilised foot bone that proves when man first started to walk"

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*