Trading Liberty for Security

Grandkids to welcome ‘Uberveillance’
By Darren Pauli
Computerworld Australia 

You may reject the idea of a microchip implant, but your grandchildren could embrace them, according to an Australian professor.

Katrina Michael, associate professor of the University of Wollongong’s school of information systems and technology, and author of scientific paper Towards a State of Uberveillance, said subdermal chip implants in humans could be commonplace within two to three generations.

But at present, she regards the device as a threat to life and liberty because technologists and politicians largely do not know if silicon chips could harm the human body and have not determined the terms in which the devices can be used.

“You will have a new breed of tech-savvy individuals that are more adaptable to technologies. But you could forget about getting Australians to have chip implants now,” Michael said.

“For instance [microchips] are problematic for motoring patients with psychological conditions. You may need to balance the patient’s well being, public safety and their ability to consent to the implant.”

Michael said human microchips could rid chronic illness sufferers from the need to visit hospital by sending simple data on their health to a doctor.

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