“National Screen-Free Week” Starts April 30. American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Has Been Concerned About RF Exposure From Cell Phones and Devices Since At Least 2012.

By B.N. Frank

Thanks to the Campaign for a Commercial Free Childhood for creating “National Screen-Free Week.”

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is one of their partners and they provided information on how much screen time is recommended for kids of all ages.

Since 2012, AAP has voiced their concerns about RF exposure from cell phones and other devices many times.  No “safe” level of cell phone or wireless (WiFi) radiation has yet to be scientifically determined for children or pregnant women.

  1. In 2012, AAP wrote a letter to the Federal Communications Commission Chairman and asked him to open up a review of RF guidelines from cell phone exposure.
  2. In 2012, AAP wrote a letter to then US Representative Dennis Kucinich in support of his “Cell Phone Right to Know” Act.
  3. In 2013, AAP wrote a letter to FCC Commissioner Mignon Clyburn and FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg requesting that they call for a review of RF guidelines.

Since 2009, Dr. Oz has also warned about cell phone radiation exposure – especially in regard to children.

Most of us are aware that “Digital Addiction” from screens of all kinds has been a hot topic for over a year now.

Because of this, we keep also hearing how tech has been marketed as necessary for kids to get a good education.  All the while tech inventors have been limiting their own children’s use of devices as well as sending them to private “low tech” schools.

Over the weekend, PBS ran the 1976 film, Network.  It’s a satire about how TV dramatically changed the world – and not in a good way.

Maybe PBS planned the airing of the film to coincide with “National Screen-Free Week.”  Then again, maybe they didn’t.  PBS’s Sesame Street has a character named “Smarty” who is a cell phone and he is featured regularly with Elmo.

Regardless, watching Network is a good reminder of how much history can and does repeat itself.  What’s going on now is actually very similar to what was going 42 years ago:

  1. Everybody knows things are bad.”
  2. We’re in a lot of trouble
  3. “The whole world is becoming humanoid.”
  4. The world is a business.”

Of course, the world never stopped being a business.  Is it worse now than in 1976?  Does it matter?  Do we really have time to evaluate this?

The Tech Industry keeps being compared to “Big Tobacco” and National Geographic Magazine is promoting the rollout of 5G small cell towers.  Let’s not forget about “Smarty, The Smart Phone” on PBS.  There are countless other examples of businesses ruling the world right now.

It doesn’t mean that everything is completely hopeless.  Only one thing is certain – we all need to try harder right now if we want to make the world a better place.  It won’t get better any other way.

Please don’t hesitate.

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