Decriminalize Drug Possession, UK Experts Say

Phillip Smith
Stop The Drug War

In a report six years in the making, the United Kingdom Drug Policy Commission, a non-governmental advisory body chaird by Dame Edith Runciman, has called for a reboot of British drug policy and for decriminalizing the possession of small amounts of drugs for personal use.

The report, A Fresh Approach to Drugs, found that the UK is wasting much of the $4.8 billion a year it spends fighting illegal drugs and that the annual cost to the country of hard drug use was about $20 billion. A smarter set of drug policies emphasizing prevention, diversion, and treatment would be a more effective use of public resources, the report found.

Some 42,000 people in the UK are convicted each year of drug possession offenses and another 160,000 given citations for marijuana possession. Arresting, citing, and jailing all those people “amounts to a lot of time and money for police, prosecution, and courts,” the report said.

“To address these costs, there is evidence to suggest that the law on the possession of small amounts of controlled drugs, for personal use only, could be changed so that it is no longer a criminal offence. Criminal sanctions could be replaced with simple civil penalties, such as a fine, perhaps a referral to a drug awareness session run by a public health body, or if there was a demonstrable need, to a drug treatment program. The evidence from other countries that have done this is that it would not necessarily lead to any significant increase in use, while providing opportunities to address some of the harms associated with existing drug laws,” the report recommended.

“Given its relatively low level of harm, its wide usage, and international developments, the obvious drug to focus on as a first step is cannabis, which is already subject to lesser sanctions than previously with the use of cannabis warnings. If evaluations indicated that there were no substantial negative consequences, similar incremental measures could be considered, with caution and careful further evaluation, for other drugs,” the report said.

But while the commission was ready to embrace decriminalization, it was not ready to go as far as legalizing drug sales.

“We do not believe that there is sufficient evidence at the moment to support the case for removing criminal penalties for the major production or supply offences of most drugs,” it said.

Still, policy makers might want to consider lowering the penalties for growing small numbers of marijuana plants to “undermine the commercialization of production, with the associated involvement of organized crime.”

The report also called for a review of harsh sentences for drug offenses, a consistent framework for regulating all psychoactive substances—from nicotine to heroin—and for moving the policy prism through which drug policy is enacted from the criminal justice system to the public health system.



But the Home Office, which currently administers drug policy in Britain, wasn’t having any of it. Things are going swimmingly already, a Home Office spokesperson said.

“While the government welcomes the UKDPC’s contribution to the drugs debate, we remain confident that our ambitious approach to tackling drugs – outlined in our drugs strategy – is the right one,” the spokesperson said. “Drug usage is at it lowest level since records began. Drug treatment completions are increasing and individuals are now significantly better placed to achieve recovery and live their lives free from drugs.”I want to take this opportunity to thank the UKDPC for its work in this area over the past six years.”

Please visit and support StopTheDrugWar.org to help end prohibition.

var linkwithin_site_id = 557381;

linkwithin_text=’Related Articles:’


Activist Post Daily Newsletter

Subscription is FREE and CONFIDENTIAL
Free Report: How To Survive The Job Automation Apocalypse with subscription

Be the first to comment on "Decriminalize Drug Possession, UK Experts Say"

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*