Russell Brand Talks Drug Policy in Parliament

Russell Brand – Wiki image

Phillip Smith
StopTheDrugWar

Actor, comedian, and ex-heroin addict Russell Brand appeared before a parliamentary committee in London Tuesday and told MPs that drug taking should not be approached as a “criminal or judicial matter” and that decriminalizing drug use could be “useful” in some regards.

Brand, 36, who recently divorced singer Katy Perry, wore a black hat, gold chains and crosses and a torn black vest top for his appearance before the committee. He called MPs “mate” and addressed them by their first names during a lively half-hour long hearing.

Brand was asked about drug legalization, but demurred, saying he didn’t think he was “particularly qualified” to make that judgment. He added, however, that, “I’m not saying we should have a wacky free-for-all where everyone takes drugs, it didn’t do me any good.”

The flamboyant entertainer appeared before the Home Affairs Committee, which is reviewing British drug policy. The Tuesday hearing was the fourth in what the committee is calling “a comprehensive review” of the drug laws. The committee also heard from opponents of relaxing the drug laws, including columnist Peter Hitchens and campaigner Mary Brett of Cannabis Skunk Sense, an all-volunteer group whose mission is to “raise awareness of the continuing and growing threat to children, teenagers and their families, posed by cannabis use.”

Brand, who has had a more than decade-long career as a comic in Britain, exploded on the US scene with his portrayal of heedless rock star Aldous Snow in 2008’s Forgetting Sarah Marshall, a role he reprised and expanded on as the falling-off-the wagon rocker in Get Him to the Greek in 2010. Brand also played the role of the alcohol-besotted title character in last year’s Arthur, a remake of the Dudley Moore classic.

But Brand has also been a thoughtful and incisive author, commentator, and radio and television host whose views have been informed by his own struggles with substances. His 2007 autobiography My Booky Wook dealt extensively with his drug-using career and subsequent abstinence, and he won wide acclaim for his open letter For Amy after the alcohol overdose death of Grammy award-winning chanteuse Amy Winehouse last year.

The legal status of drugs didn’t matter much to addicts, Brand said. “I’m not a legal expert. I’m saying that, to a drug addict, the legal aspect is irrelevant,” he said. “If you need to get drugs, you will. The criminal and legal status, I think, sends the wrong message. Being arrested isn’t a lesson, it’s just an administrative blip,” he added.

“For me what is more significant is the way we socially regard the condition of addiction,” Brand said. “It is something I consider to be an illness, and therefore more of health matter than a criminal or judicial matter. It is more important that we regard people suffering from addiction with compassion and there is a pragmatic rather than a symbolic approach to treating it.”



Brand pointed to the experience of Portugal, which decriminalized drug possession in 2001, saying decriminalization could be “useful and efficient.” Instead of using the “carrot and stick,” Brand said, drug addiction should be approached with “love and compassion.”

The committee will conduct further hearings before issuing a report.

Please visit StopTheDrugWar.org to help end prohibition.

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