Drug-Resistant Staph Bacteria Found in Half of US Meat

Study finds Staphylococcus aureus in 47% of beef, pork and poultry samples in U.S. supermarkets

US Meat contaminated with Staph/Wiki image

CBS News

A new study finds that much of meat and poultry sold in supermarkets is contaminated with drug-resistant staph bacteria.

Researchers bought beef, chicken, pork, and turkey in five U.S. cities and found that nearly half of the meat sampled — 47 percent — contained drug resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus.

The “staph” bacteria is linked to a range of health problems from rashes and respiratory ailments to potentially fatal illnesses such as sepsis and endocarditis. Due to overexposure, staph bacteria have grown resistant to an ever-widening range of the antibiotic drugs used to fight them; Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA has become a deadly scourge in U.S. hospitals.

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