Showing posts with label cashless society. Show all posts
Showing posts with label cashless society. Show all posts

Monday, May 26, 2014

Government Plan Would Transform Israel Into The World’s First Cashless Society

Michael Snyder
Activist Post

Will Israel be the first cashless society on the entire planet?  A committee chaired by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s chief of staff has come up with a three-phase plan to “all but do away with cash transactions in Israel”.  Individuals and businesses would still be permitted to conduct cash transactions in small amounts (at least initially), but the eventual goal is to force Israeli citizens to conduct as much business as possible using electronic forms of payment.

In fact, it has been reported that Israeli officials believe that “cash is bad” because it fuels the underground economy and allows people to avoid paying taxes.  It is hoped that requiring most transactions to be conducted in cash will reduce crime and help balance the national budget. And once 98 or 99 percent of all transactions are cashless, it will not be difficult for the Israeli government (or any other government) to go the rest of the way and ban cash transactions altogether.

But is a cashless society actually desirable?  This is a question that people all over the world will have to start asking as governments increasingly restrict the use of cash.

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

'Better Than Cash Alliance' Backed by Bill Gates to Usher in Cashless Society

image source
Brandon Turbeville
Activist Post

It appears that while Bill Gates was content to play the role of Microsoft innovator and billionaire philanthropist early on, he has decided that the second half of his life deserves a more open and slightly more honest twist.

Indeed, in recent years Bill Gates and his Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation have funded a variety of initiatives aimed at reducing population, promoting toxic vaccinations, and now hyping and funding the development of the cashless society.

In a recent article by Peter McCoy published in Bloomberg Businessweek, McCoy reveals that Bill Gates is opposed to physical cash currency because, like vaccine-free populations who are able to determine their own reproduction rates, it hurts poor people (according to Gates).

Indeed, McCoy writes that Gates “hates cash” “because of its effect on people at the opposite end of the wealth spectrum—the world’s poor and unbanked." Of course, in third world countries that are suffering from starvation, civil war, and abysmal living standards, the answer is clearly “banking.”

Sunday, February 5, 2012

Cashless Society: Bank of America Refuses Cash for Mortgage Payment

Activist Post

In another example that we appear to be rapidly moving into a cashless society, Bank of America in California refused to accept cash for a mortgage payment.  The manager of the bank said it was against their policy to accept legal tender physical currency (aka U.S. dollars) as payment for BoA mortgages.

The customer attempting to pay his mortgage, firefighter Robert Somerton, recorded the ordeal in Lakeport branch which made the bank manager so upset that he called the police.  The police detained Somerton for a half hour before releasing him with a warning that he may never return to that BoA branch or he'll be arrested.

"I was shocked. I had no idea this would happen. Since when does a bank not accept cash?" Robert wrote after the affair.


Monday, January 23, 2012

India's Biometric ID Scheme

Corbett Report

See Transcript and Sources HERE

RELATED ARTICLE:
Cashless Society: India Implements First Biometric ID Program


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Monday, October 17, 2011

Louisiana prohibits residents from using cash when buying, selling secondhand goods

Dollar no longer legal tender?
AFP image
Jonathan Benson
Natural News

If you buy or sell secondhand goods and live in the state of Louisiana, you can no longer use legal tender to complete such transactions. Ackel & Associates LLC (A&A), a professional law firm, explains that House Bill 195 of the 2011 Regular Session (Act 389), which was recently passed by the state legislature and signed into law by Gov. Bobby Jindal, prohibits anyone who "buys, sells, trades or otherwise acquires or disposes of junk or used or secondhand property [from entering] into any cash transactions in payment for the purchase of [such items]."

Besides prohibiting the use of cash, the law also requires such "dealers" to collect personal information like name, address, driver's license number, and license plate number from every single customer, and submit it to authorities. And the only acceptable form of payment in such situations is a personal check, money order, or electronic transfer, all of which must be carefully documented.

The stated purpose of the law, which excludes non-profits and pawn shops, is to curb criminal activity involving the reselling of stolen goods, particularly metals such as copper, silver, and gold. But according to A&A, existing Louisiana state law already requires businesses and other resellers of secondhand goods to account for transactions, and has specific laws already on the books that address the selling of stolen goods.

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Friday, April 8, 2011

Minnesota Republicans want to outlaw cash-carrying poor people

Fight Back News

St. Paul, MN – Minnesota Republicans are pushing legislation that would make it a crime for people on public assistance to have more $20 in cash in their pockets any given month. This represents a change from their initial proposal, which banned them from having any money at all.

On March 15, Angel Buechner of the Welfare Rights Committee testified in front of the House Health and Human Services Reform Committee on House File 171. Buechner told committee members, “We would like to address the provision that makes it illegal for MFIP [one of Minnesota’s welfare programs] families to withdraw cash from the cash portion of the MFIP grant - and in fact, appears to make it illegal for MFIP families to have any type of money at all in their pockets. How do you expect people to take care of business like paying bills such as lights, gas, water, trash and phone?”

House File 171 would make it so that families on MFIP - and disabled single adults on General Assistance and Minnesota Supplemental Aid - could not have their cash grants in cash or put into a checking account. Rather, they could only use a state-issued debit card at special terminals in certain businesses that are set up to accept the card.

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Monday, January 31, 2011

Cashless Society: ‘Facebook Nation’ unveils its new currency

Patrick Henningsen
21st Century Wire

The 21st century has certainly witnessed a progression towards a ‘cashless society’, but social networking giant Facebook are taking things a step further, throwing their hat into the ring with the introduction of a new compulsory monetary policy that will initially govern its share of the multi-billion dollar online games industry.

Imagine a virtual world where all goods and services are to be offered, bought and paid for by a new virtual-local form of electron currency. Facebook will be piloting such a scheme for their multimillion dollar online games market. As of July 2011, every social game developer on Facebook will have to offer the social network’s “virtual currency credits”.

According to a recent news release from Marketing Week, “Over the next five months developers will have to implement credits as a payment method within their games”. The games industry already accounts for 70% of the virtual goods transactions on the site.

Thursday, December 23, 2010

Banknotes go electric to outwit counterfeiters

Image: Action Press/Rex Features
Editor's Note: Used to "simplify tracking" of bank notes.  How convenient.

John Evans
New Scientist

GOOD old-fashioned cash is to go down the electronic route, now that it is possible to stamp simple electronic circuits directly onto banknotes.

Modern banknotes contain up to 50 anti-counterfeiting features, but adding electronic circuits programmed to confirm the note's authenticity is perhaps the ultimate deterrent, and would also help to simplify banknote tracking.

Silicon-based electronic circuits are clearly too thick to be incorporated into thin and fragile banknotes, but semiconducting organic molecules might be a viable alternative.

A team of German and Japanese researchers created arrays of thin-film transistors (TFTs) by carefully depositing gold, aluminium oxide and organic molecules directly onto the notes through a patterned mask, building up the TFTs layer by layer.

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Tuesday, December 7, 2010

New Rules: You And The IRS This January

Dees Illustration
David Nguyen
Activist Post

The new ObamaCare1099 rule for reporting of all cash, credit and check business transactions of $600 or more is scheduled to begin January of 2012.  This is really an extension of the 2008 Housing and Recovery Act IRS rules that start this January when merchant banks and PayPal will report business sales directly to the IRS (the reporting threshold is $20,000 and 200 transactions a year).

These new IRS rules will affect every American:

• Income tax collection could rise as much as $345 billion a year
• Small businesses will be crushed and unemployment will rise
• A cashless economy is further set in motion
• IRS snooping and audits will increase
• Gold can be tracked
• Identity theft is a risk
• Government surveillance will increase

Thursday, October 7, 2010

Social Micro-Engineering Begins: NYC May Ban 'Sugary Drinks' From Food Stamp Buys

John Galt
Activist Post

The Associated Press reported today that under a new government plan to battle obesity in New York City, food stamp recipients would be banned from purchasing "sugar-sweetened beverages:"
Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Gov. David Paterson announced Thursday that they are seeking permission from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which administers the nation's food stamp program, to add sugary drinks to the list of prohibited goods for city residents receiving assistance.

Friday, October 1, 2010

Will the Dollar Rebound Before Being Dissolved Into Global Currency?

Eric Blair

Every time the dollar begins to decline, I wonder, "Is this it, is this the end to the fiat dollar?"  The fundamentals suggest that it should be finished, but just as the world is about to declare it dead, miraculously a global storyline seems to emerge just when needed and foreign investors rush back in for "safety."  A clear example was the steady drumbeat of a sovereign-foreign-debt war that resulted in reports of whether the Euro would even survive, while the dollar enjoyed a triumphant ride up victory mountain.

Since the "world" declared the Euro debt crisis saved, the focus has shifted to exposing America's deficit problems, which has led to the dollar collapsing to its 5-month low against the Euro. There seems to be a growing realization by foreign countries that a volatile dollar as the world's reserve currency is unhealthy for their nations and the global economy as a whole -- especially as it pertains to vital commodities like oil and food.  This increased awareness is causing foreign governments to invest more in other currencies, gold, and even vast stretches of agricultural land -- while beginning to advocate for a more stable global reserve currency.

Monday, August 30, 2010

The Death of Cash? All Over the World Governments are Banning Large Cash Transactions

The Economic Collapse

Are we witnessing the slow but certain death of cash in this generation?  Is a truly cashless society on the horizon?  Legislation currently pending in the Mexican legislature would ban a vast array of large cash transactions, but the truth is that Mexico is far from alone in trying to restrict cash. All over the world, governments are either placing stringent reporting requirements on large cash transactions or they are banning them altogether. We are being told that such measures are needed to battle illegal drug traffic, to catch tax evaders and to fight the war on terror. But are we rapidly getting to the point where we will have no financial privacy left whatsoever? Should we just accept that we have entered a time when the government will watch, track and trace all financial transactions? Is it inevitable that at some point in the near future ALL transactions will go through the banking system in one form or another (check, credit card, debit card, etc.)?

The truth is that we now live at a time when people who use large amounts of cash are looked upon with suspicion. In fact, authorities in many countries are taught that anyone involved in a large expenditure of cash is trying to hide something and is probably a criminal.

And yes, a lot of criminals do use cash, but millions upon millions of normal, law-abiding citizens simply prefer to use cash as well.  Should we take the freedom to use cash away from the rest of us just because a small minority abuses it?

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