Education in a Police State: Schools Across the US Firing Guidance Counselors — Opt for Cops Instead

police-state-educationBy Matt Agorist

This week, the United States Department of Education (DOE) released a collection of survey data from all 95,000 public schools in America. According to the DOE, the 2013-14 Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC) is a survey of all public schools and school districts in the United States. The CRDC measures student access to courses, programs, instructional and other staff, and resources — as well as school climate factors, such as student discipline and bullying and harassment — that impact education equity and opportunity for students.

The trove of data highlights a frightening state of affairs in which public schools now find themselves.

One of the trends shown in the data is the removal of guidance counselors. According to a report in the Washington Post, high school counselors often have tough jobs. They keep track of their students’ progress toward graduation. They help students apply to college and navigate the financial aid process. They also help kids navigate their lives outside of school, which can be made complex by poverty, violence and family trouble. And because counselors often are one of the first positions to be cut when budgets get tight, there are almost never enough to go around. The national average is close to 500 students per school counselor; many students have no counselor at all.

While the data shows that students have declining access to a kind and caring role model to guide them through their high school careers, the number of students who have access to a police officer is growing.

A whopping 1.6 million (k – 12th grade) students attended a school that employs a law enforcement officer — but has no counselor.

According to the CRDC report, which counted cops in schools for the very first time, 24 percent of elementary schools and 42 percent of high schools have armed police officers. In schools with higher concentrations of minorities that number skyrockets.

It seems that schools in America are starting to more closely resemble prisons than learning facilities. Think about it — children are locked in behind steel doors all day long as armed agents of the State patrol the grounds. A few minutes out of the day, the students are given a little yard time — and again, they are kept under the watch of armed state agents.

Video after video shows the horrific nature of such a practice as children are seen being maced, beaten, and tasered for normal childhood behaviors.

The mere act of being a child is now criminalized.

As the Free Thought Project previously reported, according to statistics released by the U.S. Department of Education and published by NBC News, in the 2011-2012 school year, teachers called the cops on students a total of 31,961 times in the state of California alone, leading to 6,341 arrests.

With 175 8-hour-long school days, that means that every 2.6 seconds a cop is called!

At one California school district, in particular, East Side Union High School District in San Jose, police were called on students 1,745 times during the 2011-2012 school year. This one school called the police on students more than ten times a day!

Just last month, we reported on the video showing a San Antonio Independent School District police officer body slam a 12-year-old girl. In February, the Free Thought Project brought you the story of the Baltimore School cop who was seen beating a student who had done nothing wrong.

In fact, recent videos have revealed a myriad of school cops attacking unarmed students. In December, Officer Rigo Valles was cleared of any wrongdoing after grabbing a student by the neck and slamming him to the floor. In October, Richland County Deputy Ben Fields was fired after students recorded him flipping over a girl’s desk and dragging her across the floor. Oklahoma City Master Sgt. Thomas Jaha was charged with assault and battery in October as well, after repeatedly punching a student in the face for not having a hall pass.

In November, prosecutors agreed to dismiss assault charges against Louisville Metro Police Officer Jonathan Hardin for punching a student in the face if the former officer completes anger management classes. Hardin still faces wanton endangerment, official misconduct, and assault charges for choking another student unconscious in a separate incident five days later. In separate incidents earlier this year, school cops have also been caught attacking an autistic boy, body-slamming a child, and raping nearly two dozen students.

And these are the ones the public knows about — How many more incidents, just like this one, go unreported and unpunished?

Instead of attempting to solve a problem with logic and reason, schools are now taking the easy road and turning to the barrel of a gun to force compliance. This is not only dangerous and lazy, but it’s entirely unnecessary.

A study of more than 185,000 private and public school users from 2010 to 2014 revealed that violence is largely a problem in the public school sector. Private schools, unlike public schools, have an incentive to create a safe and caring environment for their students, so they take a far more proactive approach to prevent bullying — and it works.

Without using police force, private schools are able to reduce bullying and violence to levels far below that of public schools. Imagine that.

What this data illustrates is the societal dependence on the State to solve matters that should be handled without government. Being dependent upon the state to solve one’s problems is a de facto dependency upon violence.

The State represents violence in a concentrated and organized form. The individual has a soul, but as the State is a soulless machine, it can never be weaned from violence to which it owes its very existence. – Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi

If you truly want a glimpse into the horrid effects of the police state on all school children, take a scroll through our archives, at this link.

Until people wake up to the reality of relying on a system of violence to maintain “order,” we can expect this problem to get worse.

Ain’t it funny how the factory’s doors close
Round the time that the school doors close
Round the time that the doors of the jail cells
Open up to greet you like the reaper
-Rage Against the Machine, Ashes in the Fall

Matt Agorist is the co-founder of TheFreeThoughtProject.com, where this article first appeared. He is an honorably discharged veteran of the USMC and former intelligence operator directly tasked by the NSA. This prior experience gives him unique insight into the world of government corruption and the American police state. Agorist has been an independent journalist for over a decade and has been featured on mainstream networks around the world.

  • eddysachs

    This has nothing to do with economics (imo)…it has everything to do with an all encompassing stasi Police State juggernaut as suggested by the article above …incrementally evolving into the BORG dark-side -thx to our dual-citizen neocon zionists that have been securely ensconced inside our hijacked & usurped US Federal govn’t ever since 9-11….Are people that ‘deaf dumb & blind’ to this pre-planned draconian nightmare coming right at us like an Orwellian fascistic/ totalitarian brooding thunderstorm….or just comfortably numb hiding in their ‘comfort zones’ of SMART tech replacing reality with a quasi Matrix digital reality?…”How can you run when you know”

    • Spot on!

      • eddysachs

        Just me getting frustrated with the entranced & enslaved / alpha-waved ‘Sheeple- Hypnozombs’..,sleep-walking to the discombobulation of the matrix Bizarro World flip- side of Superman Lore …since you obviously “Get It’ …cheers & good luck…We’re gonna need it!

  • blue579

    Getting rid of guidance counselors makes sense if the aim of public school is not education and TPTB have made it clear they want to shift away from traditional high school and college courses towards “work force training” – globally. Robotics and Agenda 2030 are expected to eliminate billions of jobs. Training for what?

    • josh R.

      IMO, it could be pretty usefull. I know plenty of people that could use whatever it as, as they are pretty damn ignorant.

      I’ve got friends that can’t even do basic things like change their own oil , or replace a simple fuel filter on a cavalier. 3 steps , thats it.

      • blue579

        You make a good point. We’ve been too compartmentalized skill-wise, docs can’t fix their cars or homes, mechanics and carpenters get lost in medical jargon, etc. If the Rockefellers and their buddies hadn’t captured the education system there would be more balance, open sharing of knowledge, and teaching DIY skills similar to what can be found in youtube but better.

  • purrsun

    Taught HS in 3 states, and after ’90s saw dissolution of support services for students, teachers/ staff. Guidance counselors where put in charge of “testing” programs and functioned as attache’s to admin. Busy work – anything to keep from addressing the real needs of real humans. As teacher, spent many hours in committees to write Mission Statements. Public consumption only. Focus on sports training was an unmentioned top priority. After many years of expense, parents believe their child is destined for athletic scholarship in illusory college system. What about the Time to be a child, or family, that can not be recouped?

    Public schools have been hollowed out to a lifeless shell. Stepford counselors, cops, kids . . .
    et al.

  • GAZOO

    School is where you go to learn how to be stupid.

  • I tried to post this to my FB wall and I got notification from FB requiring extra security information because this information might not be safe, whatever safe means.

    • FB and Zuckerberg are part of the problem, not the solution.

      • I know. I need FB for my business. I held out until I had to sell out my principles 2 1/2 years ago and open an account. That said, I post a lot of articles like this. I have a huge friend base and I know that some of these posts and commentaries have awakened a few and that is good enough for me.

        • Tough world, difficult choices. Thanks for doing what you can, that’s all any of us can do.

  • This is why it becomes harder for me to have sympathy for the military. Every kid signing up probably spent 10,000 hours in front of a video game and yet can’t bother to do a few hours of research on the history of the country and the wars that have been fought.

  • Tabbytha

    The elites are winning…..

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