Friday, November 8, 2013

See the World's First 3D Printed Metal Gun

This is an update to the ongoing progress with 3D printed weapons. 

Solid Concepts 3D printing 
Activist Post

The eyes of the world are on the innovation of 3D printing. Naturally, whenever a new technology is created that offers open-source DIY opportunities to the average individual, it is going to make governments and their protected corporate interests very nervous.

Such is the case with 3D weapons manufacturing. Defense Distributed has led the way with their innovations, sparking others to provide their own offerings. Their progress, as well as their subsequent hindering by the US Department of Defense Trade Controls, has been documented by a series of video updates below.

So far all 3D guns have been produced from composite materials, which has led to instability in real-world firing situations. It has to this point been a novelty, as well as a sign of things to come. The company Solid Concepts has now released a stunning metal gun modeled after the .45 caliber M1911 pistol (See test fire video below).  It seems that at least once per month we see new advancements that are leaps and bounds beyond the previous 3D weapons incarnations. The open-source nature of 3D printing is poised to render anti-gun legislation nearly obsolete. For those who believe that 3D printing can be restricted, futurist and a director of engineering at Google, Ray Kurzweil, recently noted that it will soon be possible to print an entire 3D printer from a 3D printer, at a very low cost ... globally. Then what?
The gun printed is an M1911, a single-action semi-automatic pistol, and was made with a selective laser sintering (SLS) process using powdered metals. SLS is the process by which a high-powered laser is used to fuse small particles of powder into the desired shape. (Source)
The gun was produced on a state-of-the-art industrial printer, which makes the cost of the M1911 3D printed weapon slightly prohibitive, but as we have seen with technology, it shouldn't be long before high-tech and cost effectiveness merge.



___________________________________________________________________________
Previous Update: 

Various versions of pistols and rifles have already been printed and successfully test fired. So far, "The Grizzly" pistol has managed to get off 14 single shots. Now, designer Proteus has uploaded their files for a semi-automatic pistol to Defcad.com and Fosscad Twitter. Specs are offered below.

From the DEFCAD Forum (with additional images):
I have designed a .22 LR Semiautomatic firearm. Unlike former designs such as the Shuty, this design uses almost all plastic parts (All non-plastic parts currently except the FCG cannot physically be plastic or a semiautomatic will not function) and uses weights to bring the bolt to a correct weight. You will need the following parts: 
*3D Printer with ABS capability 
*AR-15 FCG 
*AR-15 Buffer Spring 
*Ruger 10/22 Mag Spring 
*AR-15 Firing Pin 
*1x8mm metal insert (Case extraction) 
*.44 bullets to weigh down bolt (More info in the .readme) 
The barrel uses an insert around the case, but then the rest of it has a plastic bore, which means it is pre-rifled and therefore complies with the ATF. 
Magazines available in 10 and 30 round versions. NOTE, although they are based off of 10/22 magazines, they MUST be printed as they contain a built in mag-catch and will NOT work in a 10/22 rifle. 
Credit to nilsson for original 10/22 magazine design and Shanrilivan for the part of the frame that holds the FCG, which was derived from the Charon v3.0. 
Suggestions are welcome, testers even more so.
Proteus/DEFCAD
___________________________________________________________________________
Previous Update: 

Legal difficulties aside, progress continues. The Lulz Liberator built upon the work of Defense Distributed and entered into the 3D handgun market as the cheapest yet produced at just $25.

A prototype for the first fully 3D printed rifle followed. Now, just a short while later, "The Grizzly" is moving a bit closer to being worthy of the name modeled after the Canadian-built Sherman Tanks of WWII.

In fact, development is moving so fast that it prompted a frightened Huffington Post to declare:
3D-printed guns can be built entirely in one's home without a license, and the more advanced the guns get, the more dangerous 3D printing becomes. (Source)
The meaning of "dangerous" becomes debatable. If by dangerous they mean open-source self-defense for all, thus empowering responsible individuals to protect themselves against criminals and a rogue government ... then, yes, dangerous indeed.

The latest demo from the creator shows solid improvement, increasing to 14 shots of Winchester Dynapoints from just 1 in the first video they posted. According to creator ThreeD Ukulele, files will be available soon for download.

Creator "Matthew" explained to The Verge some of the upgrades to the original Grizzly that led to the vast improvement in performance:
Matthew said he improved upon his first design of the Grizzly by making the barrel 50 percent larger, increasing the size of the receiver (the main portion that holds the firing mechanism), and adding groves to the inside of the barrel. (Source)
Please read the chronicle below to understand the pitched battle between those who desire freedom and the regulators who would have us believe that this technology is a slippery slope down the path to utter anarchy.


________________________________________________________________________________
Previous Updates:



Similar to the original Liberator, it didn't last long: the barrel and receiver both split after one shot. Not quite a Sherman Tank, yet. However, it does indicate slight progress and, perhaps more importantly, that the open-source nature of WikiWeapons will continue spurring interest and further development.

As noted by Extreme Tech:
Its fragility isn’t surprising given that the rifle is made from the same quality of plastic, but as seen in the Lulz Liberator it’s no more difficult to print in tougher materials. And with laser sintering patents expiring soon, the material toughness available to household skunkworks will be going up exponentially. Once printing in metal is affordable — and it will happen soon — this burgeoning DIY “defense” industry will explode. Pun intended.
________________________________________________________________________________
Previous Updates:

The Liberator to the Web following a successful test fire as seen in previous reports and videos below, as well as their latest video seen here. As Defense Distributed states: 3D printing's first killer app has arrived...



However, it didn't take long for the State Department to demand that Defense Distributed had to remove the blueprints from its website. Nevertheless, the genie was already out of the bottle with tens of thousands of downloads already registered, and many sites continuing to offer the product.

Now, just a couple of weeks later, two Wisconsin engineers are showing that not only is a 3D-printed handgun a viable alternative, it can be produced at a significant reduction in price, perhaps creating a new challenge to regulators who do not wish to see widespread access to the technology. Additional report and video below....

Defense Distributed's 3D handgun, The Liberator, was the first of its kind; and founder Cody Wilson always made a point to stress the political motivation, as well as the motivation to spread the concept. He may have done that more quickly than expected. Whereas Wilson's gun was produced on an $8,000 Stratasys Dimension SST industrial printer, and the gun still only lasted one shot, the new weapon (which sports the name The Lulz Liberator) was produced for far less cost on a consumer-grade printer with better results. Forbes reports:

One evening late last week, a Wisconsin engineer who calls himself “Joe” test-fired a new version of that handgun printed on a $1,725 Lulzbot A0-101 consumer-grade 3D printer, far cheaper than the one used by Defense Distributed. Joe, who asked that I not reveal his full name, loaded the weapon with .380 caliber rounds and fired it nine times, using a string to pull its trigger for safety.
Furthermore, the entire gun was created with just $25 worth of generic plastic. Forbes details a few more specifics ... and challenges:
Joe’s printed gun contains a few more pieces of metal hardware than the original Liberator. Rather than print plastic pins to hold the hammer in the body, for instance, he used hardware store screws. Like Defense Distributed’s gun, the Lulz Liberator also uses a metal nail for a firing pin, and includes a chunk of non-functional steel designed to make it detectable with a metal detector so that it complies with the Undetectable Firearms Act. The rifling that Joe added to the barrel is designed to skirt the National Firearms Act, which regulates improvised weapons and those with smooth-bored barrels.
Although the gun produced 9 successful shots, it did misfire, which was primarily attributed to the screws weakening, as well as expansion of the ammo cartridge. Nevertheless, this is an extremely quick advancement and cost reduction in this technology and bears close watching. Wilson has previously stated that his aim was to get this technology down into the $1,000 range. It seems that the dawn of inexpensive WikiWeapons has arrived. In the wake of the State Department crackdown on Defense Distributed, the question now becomes: how to effectively release the blueprints to the masses . . . .

Here is the video of the Lulz Liberator test fires:



End of update, previous updates below...
_____________________________________________________________________________
Defense Distributed founder, Cody Wilson, recently granted Forbes a behind-the-scenes look at how his new creation -- The Liberator -- will function:
All sixteen pieces of the Liberator prototype were printed in ABS plastic with a Dimension SST printer from 3D printing company Stratasys, with the exception of a single nail that’s used as a firing pin. The gun is designed to fire standard handgun rounds, using interchangeable barrels for different calibers of ammunition. (Source)
Politicians such as Steve Israel are responding to Cody Wilson's self-described "crypto-anarchist" political motivations by introducing legislation to criminalize this technology. But this is precisely the tension that Wilson would like to introduce:
This is an exercise in political theater, to demonstrate that technology is empowering individuals by stripping governments of the ability to enforce restrictions. Yes, you can make guns in a host of ways, including the similarly advanced technology of CNC machines. But 3D printing is a hot and increasingly accessible technology that has been specifically called out by the president. To use it to so easily defeat restrictions (or outright prohibitions) is to demonstrate the limits of the coercive power of the state. (Source)
Wilson has once again drawn Israel's attention according to the latest update from Forbes:
Congressman Steve Israel issued a press release Friday responding to this story: “Security checkpoints, background checks, and gun regulations will do little good if criminals can print plastic firearms at home and bring those firearms through metal detectors with no one the wiser,” his statement reads. “When I started talking about the issue of plastic firearms months ago, I was told the idea of a plastic gun is science-fiction. Now that this technology is proven, we need to act now to extend the ban [on] plastic firearms.”
However, Israel's comments don't address the fact that despite Wilson's anarchist leanings, he has complied every step of the way, including the issue of metal detectors by adhering to current requirements. Again, from Forbes.
The group added a six ounce chunk of steel into the body to make it detectable by metal detectors in order to comply with the Undetectable Firearms Act. In March, the group also obtained a federal firearms license, making it a legal gun manufacturer.
So far, "the system" doesn't have much of an answer for Defense Distributed's inventions and the increasing demand for their latest blueprints.

Wilson's full battery of tests before officially releasing The Liberator seems to be going according to plan. BBC reporter Rebecca Morelle was on site in Austin, Texas this past Saturday. Her report can be found in the video below.


__________________________________________________________________________
Previous updates:

A new documentary features Defense Distributed and its founder, Cody Wilson. It is an interesting look at the technology itself, as well as the philosophy behind making 3D-printed weapons available to as many people as possible even in the wake of the gun demonization, executive orders, and political turmoil which followed the mass shootings of 2012. Our chronicle of the controversy surrounding Defense Distributed, as well as their victories, follow the documentary. From the video creators:
This is a story about the rapid evolution of a technology that has forced the American legal system to play catch up. Cody Wilson, a 24-year-old University of Texas Law student, is an advocate for the open source production of firearms using 3D printing technology. This makes him a highly controversial figure on both sides of the gun control issue. MOTHERBOARD sat down with Cody in Austin, Texas to talk about the Constitution, the legal system, and to watch him make and test-fire a 3D-printed gun.


___________________
Previous updates:

Following on the heels of their homage to gun control advocates such as Andrew Cuomo and Dianne Feinstein, the ATF has granted Defense Distributed the Type 7 Federal Firearms License that the company had been seeking over the last 6 months. However, there is one more step before they will be able to go full throttle:
Wilson will not actually be able to manufacture and sell guns until he receives a Class 2 Special Occupational Taxpayer add-on to his FFL. (Source)
As you will read below, the corporate media has begun to focus on Defense Distributed's founder Cody Wilson and his political views and statements in what could be the start of a serious campaign of demonization.

Wilson explains to ArsTechnica what the newly obtained Type 7 License enables him to do:
"The big thing it allows me to do is that it makes me [a manufacturer] under the law—everything that manufacturers are allowed to do," he told Ars. "I can sell some of the pieces that we've been making. I can do firearms transactions and transport."
The license is pictured below:

Visit the Defense Distributed Facebook Page Here
Ars details the next step in the licensing process that will propel Defense Distributed into full-fledged manufacturing and sales, even for automatic weapons:
Currently, Wilson said he will not actually begin manufacturing and selling guns until he receives an “add-on” to his FFL, known as a Class 2 Special Occupational Taxpayer (SOT), as licensed under federal law (PDF). This would allow him to manufacture and deal a broader range of firearms under the National Firearms Act. The Class 2 SOT would grant Wilson the ability to manufacture, for example, a fully-automatic rifle. Wilson applied for the SOT on Saturday and expects to receive approval within a few weeks.
However, some of Cody Wilson's previous statements, which can be read below, were directed toward specific politicians, including his brash guarantee of success in thwarting any and all gun control measures by stating "good f---ing luck." In so doing, he seems to have drawn some ire from the mainstream media.

NBC chose to title this news, which they sourced from The Verge's dryly titled "Defense Distributed gets license to make and sell 3D printed guns," to something quite different altogether, "ATF grants 'crypto-anarchist' license for 3-D printing of guns" - highlighting part of the description from his Facebook page. The article goes on to characterize Defense Distributed as a "loosely organized group" where Wilson "IS" the group. 3D printing is couched in the following manner:
some of its more notable efforts so far have been for medical, space and scientific projects, including helping repair broken bones and building spacecraft parts, as well as commercial efforts including athletic shoes.
The implication appearing to be that 3D weapons manufacturing is not to be included in that list of beneficent uses. It remains to be seen if other mainstream outlets will follow suit and make 3D weapons out to be the next great threat to freedom, rather than one of the cornerstones of preserving it.

updated 3/19
______________________________________________________________________

The latest from Defense Distributed is in honor of gun-control proponent, Dianne Feinstein. Founder of Defense Distributed, Cody Wilson, states his reasoning for offering their latest creation:
“We want to commemorate a personal failure of Feinstein’s to take away semi-automatic weapons,” Wilson, who is also a law student in Austin, Texas, told The Huffington Post. (Source
The ongoing homage to the futility of full gun-control follows an earlier AR-15 magazine called the "Cuomo."

Defense Distributed has consistently lashed out at attempts to offer legislation to ban 3D weapons printing, such as that of New York Congressman, Steve Israel. Congressman Israel has sought to criminalize 3D weapons, to which Cody Wilson responded succinctly, "good f***ing luck". Their latest video offers evidence that efforts are moving forward...



The early media attention resulted in Wikiweapon company Stratasys, Inc. seizing Defense Distributed's equipment and taking issue with their decentralized methods. But the genie is already out of the bottle -- downloads have topped 500,000. After some initial stutter-stepping with structural failures, their latest incarnations heralds the arrival of 3D printed semi-automatic and automatic weapons.

Ars Technica explains the short history of Cody Wilson's non-profit gun manufacturing program:
Last year, his group famously demonstrated that it could use a 3D-printed “lower” for an AR-15 semi-automatic rifle—but the gun failed after six rounds. Now, after some re-tooling, Defense Distributed has shown that it has fixed the design flaws and a gun using its lower can seemingly fire for quite a while. (The AR-15 is the civilian version of the military M16 rifle.) [Source]
The results can be seen in part 3 of their ongoing video series chronicling their development and improvement. Over 600 rounds of .223 ammunition are fired without fail using a 3D-printed "lower" for an AR-15, with Wilson stating that it likely could have gone to 1,000.



The ability for anyone to print a weapon could be one of the cornerstones for widespread freedom and resistance to top-down tyranny. Lawmakers such as Steve Israel have stated that any restrictions on 3D printing of weapons will be very difficult if not impossible to enforce, and the Justice Department has so far backed up their legality. As Tony Cartalucci has stated, it renders gun control moot; one would have to basically ban any personal use of 3D printers.
Preventing people from manufacturing guns, or worse yet, from possessing or using tools that can be used to create guns, is both ludicrous and impossible. Like with cars or anything else, laws are there to ensure we don't harm others by abusing any given right or implement - not preventing us from having those rights or implements responsibly in the first place. 
As the cost of production goes down, and states continue to assert their inherent rights to govern without federal interference, there will likely be a wave of non-profit and for-profit manufacturers alike, as Wilson states:
The law student said that anyone with the same type of 3D printer (“SLA resin and P400 ABS on a used Dimension”) could replicate his efforts with “9 to 12 hours” of print time and “$150 to $200” in parts. "We’ve proven that you can build one for $50,” he said, presuming the builder is using lower quality materials. (Dimensions typically sell in the $30,000 range—but Wilson says his results could be duplicated using the less-expensive Ultimaker ($1,500) or Reprap.”
With the ability for anyone, anywhere to be able to defend oneself and mobilize quickly against a growing threat, governments would have to think twice before heading down the road to tyranny. Certainly the government itself has signed on to 3D manufacturing. As reported by The Singularity Hub, the Army is deploying $2.8 million fabrication labs to the frontlines as part of an overall 3-year contract with Exponent, Inc. worth $9.7 million. The intention is to make this global.

While this video focuses on other aspects of 3D printing, and injects the well-worn marketing line that all of this will save lives in humanitarian efforts, to think this will not be used to produce guns and even drones would be naive, since Stratasys -- the manufacturer that gave Defense Distributed such a hard time -- is fully signed on to assist the military-industrial complex.

However, it appears that the everyday consumer (taxpayer) will not have to wait for military tech to trickle down to offer its scraps; the benefits of 3D printing are taking on a life of their own with or without government approval.



For more information about HackerSpaces, OpenCourseWare and 3D printing solutions to our political problems, visit LocalOrg.

Additional source:
http://livewire.talkingpointsmemo.com/entry/ny-congressman-introducing-ban-on-3d-printed-high

Updated 11/7/13

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47 comments:

Anonymous said...

Extraordinary. Amazing. I'm not so sure people realize yet what this technology actually means? In the larger context it means a complete and total rebuilding of our "civilization" and how it approaches almost everything. I fear the government will put a stop to it, jail those who retain 3-D printing technology and any object made by such technology and that the oppression of the people will continue. This technology is nothing short than revolutionary and will put to bed ALL the systems and structures now in place. It means a better world for all.

Anonymous said...

Hmnmm

What is extraordinary is that the "technology" DOES NOT EXIST. People the primary components of a rifle the bolt and firing pin the barrel etc. must be made of STEEL. The chamber pressures even from a small caliber rifle are far to great for anything other than steel to withstand. Perhaps a 22 could be made to fire a round or 2 but thats about it.

This article and the many others on the net are a con nothing more. You cannot "print" a complete weapon period. There are a variety of parts that can be "printed" however all of them can be legally purchased without an FFL.The key components must be machined out of steel and cannot be "printed" Good Grief

And people you are literally playing Russian roulette attempting to fire a rifle bullet out of an all plastic gun. A 308 caliber rifle has chamber pressures in excess of 50,000 PSI.

Anonymous said...

guy above is close but wrong

In the USA all guns have a single part that is serial numbered and must be registered ( unless you make it yourself ). Every other part of a firearm can be purchased from the net and delivered to your door with no checks of any kind.

These guys are making AR15 lower receivers which are the serial numbered part in an AR15, they are normally made of aluminum but some companies actually offer carbon fiber and polymer ones as well. The AR15 lower receiver does not contain the pressure of firing the gun, that occurs in the upper receiver which is why this plastic AR15 idea is pretty safe to do/use.

The main problem with this great idea is that the printer used is a $1500 - #2000 purchase. The second problem is that you need many more metal parts to make an AR15 and several of these are complicated parts made from good steel.

So ya if you have a $2000 printer and an AR15 upper receiver , bolt, bolt carrier, firing pin, trigger, sear, hammer, mag release,stock set, barrel, barrel nut, front sight/gas block, gas tube, hand guard set, flash hider, spring kit and a 30 round magazine ( ohh wait you can print that - but you still need a mag spring ) -- If you have all those parts lying around you can build yourself a plastic receiver AR15

Penny Pincher Personal Finance said...

Exactly, 7:01, and I may add that the lower is just the stock and trigger group - the upper is where all the action is, and where the regulation is.

It is possible to take a piece of steel, and make a rifled barrel out of it, and you can even rifle a barrel by hand, as they used to - but it's an art, and better done with machinery that costs a few thousand. Gunsmithing like that is a skill you don't learn all at once.

One can make an easy 1-shot zip shotgun out of gas pipes. Shotguns don't need rifled barrels but they are also shorter range weapons. It's legal to make one (make it long enough) but you can never transfer it.

Anonymous said...

They are not printing a complete weapon, just a "lower". What makes this important is that this is the part of the weapon that normally has a serial number attached to it. Other parts (barrels, trigger mechs, etc) are all available commercially. A little research and you can avoid looking silly when you post.

Anonymous said...

Great coverage on this issue, Activist Post! 3-D printing is going to be a terrific tool in our battle to preserve the Second Amendment and, generally, to decentralize manufacturing.

Nevertheless, we still must remain hypervigilant and active in the fight stop and reverse the erosion of our Constitutional right to bear arms. Even with 3-D printing of weapons, the government can still use draconian methods of onerous fines and jail time for anyone caught violating one of their arbitrary rules. Much like the vaccine wars going on now, we see health care workers losing their jobs and reports of people getting government subsidized care being told that they will not get their prescriptions for commonplace ailments like hypertension unless they agree to get vaccinated.

We still must engage many more people in fighting the good fight. The gun control issue just may be waking up and galvanizing enough people to give us our tipping point.

Hide Behind said...

OK, so they are not building an all polymer weapon, well so far as the public knows that is; It is the posssbilitys of the technology that will affect the world far outside of how effecient one can kill that is important.
This is not new technology as I witnessed it in its early stages some 20+ years ago.
In that use it was trying to find a way to use polymers that the human body would not reject in artificial heart and heart valve transplants.
Even then in fields far removed from medicine its expertise in applying computer tech to polymer modeling was in high demand.
Yet they did not themselves in house the machinery or figure out al the chemistry or biology and fully design the very computers they were using.
Today its ability seems of great import to may within thos dites reach only because of a soon to come weapons ban.
As an example to disprove the antis arguments that banning would not take away ability for almost anyone to build their own gun. It is a two edged sword as this will only scare The hell out of and raise the level of irrrational fears the antis already posess and make them redouble their efforts.
No tech breakthroughs especially today stand alone and are "but combinations of thoughts" and only improvements or solutions to old ideas.
As to thinking that one cannot build an upper alone and need steel at present even that is not fully true.
Thete are ways today of combining metal polymers carbon andpolymers in such a way that are far stronger than many steels used in bolts or especially the steels used in rifle barrels.
As for the tech level of 3D today the consumer is getting the cast offs, old tech, of industry.
Get in on it now if you can and finf your own way to profit from or just as a hobby toy of some practicle use in your garage.
Remember the "system can be used off of gun ranges and playing war games.

Anonymous said...

PATHETIC DISHONEST ARGUMENT FROM GUN SALESMEN:

New York Congressman, Steve Israel, has sought to criminalize 3D weapons...But the genie is already out of the bottle.

The ability for anyone to print a weapon could be one of the cornerstones for widespread freedom and resistance to top-down tyranny. Lawmakers such as Steve Israel have stated that any restrictions on 3D printing of weapons will be very difficult if not impossible to enforce, and the Justice Department has so far backed up their legality. As Tony Cartalucci has stated, it renders gun control moot; one would have to basically ban any personal use of 3D printers.



Right now, people can print money on high end printers. COUNTERFEITING, A CRIME!
Right now, people can print disgusting illegal pornography involving animals, kids and rape.
CHILD PORNOGRAPHY, A CRIME!

Those things are rightly illegal, and many laws exist to prevent them. So just because you can print a gun ($thousands$ of dollars required) on a new high tech printer, does not mean you automatically have a right to do so. Should some guy fresh out of prison be able to? How about street gangs and illegal aliens? Should they be able to stop in at Kinko's and print up a few AK's?
My god, the gun salesmen are idiots, supreme idiots.

Hide Behind said...

Oh lets all get together and decide how we can make rules and regulaions we can hide behind; and be safe from the possabilitys of someones insane mind having a way to release their fantacys upon mankind.
With that kind of reasoning Bill Gates and others would of been controlled from releasing the PC's to just a few minds.
We should leave technology and its finds and usages to only those of proven mental stability, such as our pharma, military,industry and financials and who is it that is killing us?
Most people today can find multiple ways to anuse throuh their pc,s but don't
You let this tecnology get into the populaces hands and they will find usages we cannot envision at this time.
Will they all be altruistic and benign endeavors, most likely not.
Because some abuze cybersppace do we blame the PC or Bill gates and others,maybe a few wackos and religious nuts may.
If there are ways to save and make money along with being freed of the financial and industrial wage slave economy this is but one more item that may well pave the breakaway.

djohnston said...

@anonymous March 3, 2013 at 9:24 AM

People DO print funny money on high end printers. It IS counterfeiting, and it IS a crime. The people are U.S. Treasury employees, printing Federal Reserve bank notes.

"The Congress shall have Power ...
To provide for the Punishment of counterfeiting the Securities and current Coin of the United States;"

Article 1, Section 8, clause 6 of the U.S. Constitution

As to rights, were you born a creature of God, supreme deity or of Nature, or of the State? Are basic human rights inalienable, a gift from God or Nature? Or do you believe all rights are "granted" by government?

@Hide Behind

Your editing is getting better. Maybe a spell checker would help. Anyway, your views are appreciated. However, I don't think Bill Gates is the analogy you'd want to use. Microsoft's history of property theft and monopolistic practices and Bill's proclivity for eugenics are not shining examples.

Anonymous said...

I wish these low life, right infinging bastards would just butt the hell out. I could go on however I would only be repeating!!!!!!!

Nemetron 2000 said...

3D printable body armor would be a much more useful item IMHO.

It's funny, the government talks so much about the dangers of firearms yet the argument never, EVER touches on the subject of negating the effects of firearms (e.g., body armor). Hell, the shit must be good for something since all the cops, mercs... *ahmm* I mean "soldiers", bodyguards, secret service, etc., wear the stuff. Not one of our "representatives" has spoken about the possible virtues of body armor for citizens in high gun crime areas (e.g., Chicago). I know it's a shame to have to consider such things, but hell this is the state the establishment has brought this country to, so we might as well cover all possible options. Obviously, citizens in body armor would be a threat to the status-quo as well, since it would mean their henchmen would have to waste more bullets on your asses, thus raising the monetary cost of killing you.

Matt Moo said...

As an owner of a 3d Printing web site, I would like to invite everyone to check it out. No restrictions on the printables that you can upload or download. From toys to ar15 plans, its all allowed. Http://www.generationprint.com.

Anonymous said...

this is the most awesome thing i've seen in a long time. naming it after politicians is pure genius. big f-u.

Anonymous said...

Who needs a gun?? Just gazing upon Diane Feinstein's Medusa like hideousness is enough to cause men's hearts to freeze in sheer terror!
The wicked, loathsome creature!! God save us!

Hide Behind said...

FEINSTEIN may be an ugly piece of humanity nut more than once sje has helped her husband make 10's of mllions with his old Indonesian Mining partners, with her save the Cali Tortoise. Ploy for land set asides.
It shut down fomestic mining of strategic minerals and her hubby and partner just coincidently joined in an export of those metals.
THen from her position on War Council her Hubby and some new partners. Get hundreds of millions of security and supply contracts in Iraq and Afghanistan.
She may be ugly but she makes far more as an elected Harlot than mosy prossiesdo.
I bet hubby makes sure hr has enough viagra for when she wants.........Buisness is buisness.

STEADCORE said...

Just like all other technology that has been kept from us. I'm with hide behind. Give us all the technology and quit poisoning us and we will take this world into a new dimension.

Anonymous said...

Think about where you're headed with this people... It's not about printing guns (really you can't) it's about taking the production techniques for everything away from the pyramid. (Remember, the first time didn't have the luxury of automatic fabrication machines, someone had to design and make those machines AFTER the first ones were hand built). Feed yourself! You can make whatever you want with a file, some steel, a drill, A PLAN, and skills (ie. a trade or two). You CAN'T do it sitting in an armchair watching youtube instructables... it takes a little more than a couple of minutes watching a movie to make someone competent in construction of anything, however knowing half the story just makes one competent in BS and not much else. The main reason that distilling your own spirits is frowned upon is not due to the effects of the output, it's mainly due to the effects of heating, pressurising and vaporising a highly explosive substance at home. Some idiot is going to do it wrong and flatten his house (big deal), kill his family and possibly the neighbors (THAT is the issue). Printing highly stressed parts from garbage is going to get someone hurt if it's not done correctly... and calibrated (I'll watch the test from a distance thankyou) and certified as good to go. Without those processes you can build a firearm outta wood if you want! Where do you want to start the process? Finding raw materials? (locations), Mining (extraction) Chemical makeup (recipes), Refining (more recipes), Casting and Forging (metalurgical processes), Machining, Fitting, Assembly (fabrication techniques), Testing and Calibration (R and D - while keeping urself in 1 piece), Operator Training (untrained = spectacular youtube material). Have I missed something??
Footnote: Lead is soft, back in the 1700s manufacturing wasn't very repeatable so many different barrel sizes ended up in the same gun. Lead shot would squash to fit in the bores of virtually any firearm because 'tolerances' were pretty slack in them days. Who's printing your ordinance? Look at body armor types if you get the testing role... just sayin :P

Anonymous said...

I'm more interested in printing flowerpots and walking stones, and maybe, forks. Hope the price goes down soon...

Hide Behind said...

Guess what?
THE technology and knowlege of process and materials all except for one or actually more than one crucial material to build an atomic warhead or bomb has been available for over 50 years.
ONE FAR MORE EVOLVED THAN MID 60s weaponry but how many are built by people in their home garage.
I have seen 30/30 leveraction cowboy type weaponry made into slam fire full autos of 45 cal.
REPLICAS of 1911 US 45 cal copys made in mild steel that would fire 45 thomson full autos and revolnerssuch as S&W 2 357 and other cals that are almost as well done as real deals.
FOR 50 years since enf of WWII any one for around 100 bucks could build a fully functional machine pistol it is not that hard on blow backs. Timing is only critical part but do not need to be genius..
The reason I bring this up is much along this 3D bs. Yes it can make the process of building a weapon simpler but not of a real assault rifle of 1930 thru1970's low tech yet no one is doing so.
Well at least that we know of.
The tech is thhrre that indeed could send us onto greatpathways of knowlege and beauty or send us to hell.
By the examples of those in power today and their pathetic followers I will take my chance with joe sixpack with an enginneering buddy or two and for all men women and children who still search for beauty and meaning of life to use this knowlege more intelligently than those psychos.

Anonymous said...

printer kit is about 700 bucks for the 8x8 needed ;)

Anonymous said...

I can't wait until the first idiot blows off his face with one of these contraptions that only a truly insane person would find liberating.

Look, anyone can make a gun. Look, it blew my face off. How liberating is that?

How about home made nukes?
Dale

David A. Laibow said...

I'm a "crypto-anarchist" (and a "crypto-coalitionist" according to some people, as well), and I have a question about those who attempt to print and use plastic firearms: how do you get metal ammunition through a metal detector? I believe that the minimum sentence for a crime committed with a firearm is life imprisonment without parole for the person possessing the firearm, and 30 years behind bars (no time off for good behavior, no parole eligiblity) for anyone who acted in concert with the gun user at the scene of the crime.

Anonymous said...

Does it really matter if you unable to purchase ammo? Every Walmart is sold out and the Goverment seems to be large quantities that disrupts the consumer for being able to purchase.

Dr. Paul Blake, N.D. said...

The government and press have known all along that every school shooter was on anti-depression drugs with violent side effects but never brought up that issue, to much corp. money involved.

Instead of dealing with the real problem the government uses corporal punishment to try to control guns, in other words punishing the average person for what a few messed up minds and fundamentalist political wacko's do. The Government has been wrong from the beginning punishing the good people while placing gun power in the hands of the nut cases. Their Stupid laws only breed creative ideas to go around the stupid laws, ah-kee toro, printable guns.

Happy Healthy Trails
Doc Blake

Mark McCandlish said...

Great article. And I love the comments by the readers. Doesn't really explain "what" 3D printing is though. There are several approaches, but the general idea is, you pick the part to be reproduced, program the device to layer it, like so many thin slices off a block of cheese, then the printer builds them in a stable, un-moving environment, one layer at a time.

Yes, the technology has been around a long time. Over twenty years. The first systems used a vat of light-sensitive polymer liquid plastic. The polymer would harden when exposed to ultraviolet light. So the "layers" are drawn on the surface of the liquid with a computer-controlled ultraviolet laser. (Part of the high cost right there.)

Just below the surface is a pickup tray, and after each layer is drawn and hardens under exposure of the ultraviolet light, the tray lowers a fraction of an inch deeper into the vat, the next layer is drawn and so on, until the entire piece is created, one layer at a time.

Another method is using a mild cutting laser to slice the silhouette of each layer out of paper (or a similar material of uniform thickness) then glue the pieces together. It's rough and a little messy, but it works.

In answer to comments above about a plastic gun not being able to withstand the explosive power of a bullet firing- that's true. HOWEVER, a polymer plastic part generated on a 3D printer, can be used as a buck around which you can pour casting stone (like they use to make crown and bridgework in dental prosthetics) and when properly cast under pressure, will yield a fairly accurate (and somewhat durable) metal part. In fact the whole gun could be made this way. Of course a cast barrel assembly is not as strong as a forging, but one can wrap it with carbon fiber filament and polyester resin for added containment.

In response to the comment on grain alcohol and the requirement of the bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms (and now) Explosives was not only the public safety issue in my view. I think that the fact that grain alcohol can run in your car as fuel was also a reason to restrict its potential competition with Big Oil.

Anonymous said...

"Fresh out of prison"? I thought after you had served your time we started treating them like people again. I guess not all of us accept the fact that by creating a lifetime of punishment for a single crime you remove any incentive for ex cons to change.

David A. Laibow said...

What's the big deal about a 3D-printed plastic handgun? I am working on a 3D-printed plastic 5-kiloton atomic bomb, which can be launched from my 3D-plastic missile silo as the warhead of a 3D-printed ICBM. Now, THAT's technology in action!

Anonymous said...

Big Brother is only taking exception to the decentralisation part, the fact that you can do it at home and no-one knows.... where's our control then?
The printers are only as good as the method and stock used. They could be used to make food but you have to be able to use food as the stock.
That firearm is a bomb, not a gun! Sure, you may be able to fire a few rounds before it self destructs. However, I guess it only takes one bullet to kill.
Impossible to legislate against fools. If something is made that is 'idiot proof' along comes a better idiot....

Anonymous said...

Woo hoo! Can't wait till the NRA starts marketing it to the sheep at large. Stick around, this is going to be fun, kiddies.

Hide Behind said...

I am willing to bet that the sex toy industry had more guns going off than weapons company's.

THE POSSABILITYS ARE HUGE IN THE WOMANS MARKET; and tiny or a lot smaller in the males.
that way the NRA guys can eat a gun or whatever HUMAN anatomical part they favor while fondling a real gun as the wait in duck and dear ahhh deer blinds. JUST AS LONG AS THEIR WIVES CLEAN UP THEIR SHOP AND TOOLING WHEN THEY GOT WHAT THEY WANT.

Anonymous said...

This is a good way to get more guns into the hands of criminals and terrorists and crazy people.

No gun possession should be allowed without a background check.

This has nothing to do with liberty (if you define liberty as gun possession, you are crazy as well as stupid); it has everything to do with finding ways to avoid rational gun regulations.

And how many will blow their faces off or take out the piece of metal so they can carry their guns onto airplanes, etc.

Do we really need more ways for criminals and crazies to obtain guns? Do we really need more guns? There will be no liberty until the massive gun carnage in this nation is addressed with the kind of rational gun laws which give all other advanced nations a 90-99% reduced gun murder rate than the US. There will be no liberty until the US no longer rates with backward 3d world nations with civil wars and paramlitary violence but joins the other 34 advanced nations in getting a handle on the gun violence. In 50 years, Japan has reduced its gun murder rate by 99%, and now has 99% fewer gun murders a year than the US. Australia has reduced its gun homicide rate by over 50% since new laws in 1985. The US gun murders peaked the year the Brady Act was passed, and within 5 years, it had dropped from 17K to 10K. The lesson of 34 similar nations, as well as the US experience is that guns laws become more effective the longer they exist.

When gun murders drop drastically, overall murder rates also drop, as do suicides. Guns make killing quick, simple, and efficient. That is not a good thing. Plastic printed guns are a good way to
circumvent rational gun laws, and who would want to do that? Those who otherwise would be prohibited from obtaining guns.

This is madness, but it appeals to a certain immature personality type which identifies freedom with more guns, when in fact, more guns is the blueprint for mayhem and fear and the loss of freedom.

This will all blow over after a few folks blow their faces off and politicians, after the fact, criminalize any weapons which are not subject to background checks and detectable by metal detectors.

Wow...plastic gun....I can get it thru the airport, thru the school metal detectors......wow....until kaboom and your face is sliced up with slivers of plastic.

Einstein saw the connection when he said: "It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has exceeded our humanity."

He might have added "and our intelligence."

Dale

Anonymous said...

More Einstein on the disconnect between technological brilliance and human wisdom: "Technological progress is like an axe in the hands of a pathological criminal."

The printed gun is exactly the kind of "progress" he had in mind.
Dale

Anonymous said...

The lulz liberator files were leaked! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q6doD3xjE50

Bloodstock said...

Ya gotta love American ingenuity! The bad guys will NEVER take that away from us. NEVER!

Hide Behind said...

This is not about gun control; It is about mind and cultural formation of a new society and who will gain control of that society.

Absconditus said...

Blah..Blah..Blah.. Guns-r-badd..M-kay..

I'd venture to bet most people commenting on how bad gun violence is. NEVER actually see much gun violence. Other than the conditioning on the boob-tube. I can personally say other than TV, I have never seen anyone shoot another person with malicious intent.

So then we can address suicides, I suppose. One need only look at Japan. No guns. One of the highest suicide rates. Removing guns obviously is not the solution to that problem.

So then what is the problem really? Is it the culture of hate, division and violence that seems so pervasive in western society? Is it the fact a large portions goal is to be better than the next? Is it the fact that since edumacation we're taught to stick in groups and diminish those who aren't in the clique?

I would never shoot a person out of malice because I know its morally wrong to do so. No one taught me that. If people believe that some external force is required to teach that its not okay to extinguish the life of another person - we're in serious trouble.

We created this. We just don't want to own up to it. Personally, I think the citizens of this country would be the greatest standing army. That would be all we need. That was the intention.

josephbc69 said...

As a member of the Religious Society of Friends [Quakers], I am also a strong advocate of Second Amendment rights, from an anarcho-Christian POV. Betcha never heard of that before, eh?

I'm also a damned good shot, familiar w/most common weapons, such as revolvers, semi-auto hand guns and rifles, and common hunting firearms.

I turned 70 in February, and in all that time I can attest that I never saw a firearm kill any one, ever, not in front of me, on TV, in a movie, or anywhere in any way. Never, ever, NEVER, as in NO FREAKING WAY!

I have ALWAYS --w/o exception-- seen people kill people. Period.

If you can find a single instance in all of human history --world-wide-- when a weapon of ANY sort, sword, shotgun, or Derringer, simply one day decided it was time to kill a human, please send me that documented event in an email w/your dedicated source.

Now it's time to get back to reality....

Anonymous said...

The thing about using 3D printers to make guns is that not everybone has the equipment or know-how to make a home-made gun any other way. Yes it might be easy to make an AK-47 knock-off in your garage, IF you have the right equipment and know-how-and if you have a garage, of course.

How much space does a 3-D printer take up, and how easy is it to use?

I'm sure they'll get more compact and simpler to use in the future, and cheaper too.The product itself of course, needs to be more durable and with better performance, but I'm sure that will come. Being able to manufacture 3-D ammo would also be a huge breakthrough.

And what about an enterprising type thinking, I know, I'll buy a 3-D printer and some feedstock, sell the guns for peanuts but make a ton of money because of low production costs and high turnover. Everybody will know they're not much good. but there's loads of people who'd jump at the chance to have a couple of extra guns around, even if they unuseable after a few shots. That could be all you need them for.

If that starts to happen in a big way, there'll be so many of these things that buying one will be no harder than buying a bit of grass.

Anonymous said...

I respectfully refer everyone to the first reply post. it seems to pretty much sum it all up, months ago.

Anonymous said...

@ 10:33

Amen. I have made the argument before that we already have laws that prohibit physically harming or killing others, so gun control is a bit redundant.

The counterargument I've seen is that reducing access will result in less overall violent crime including homicides. The poster above made this very argument.

That may reduce crazy lone gunman situations (maybe in 100 years, but not in our lifetime I think), but will it stop drug gangs from killing each other one way or another? Will it stop violent crimes motivated by greed, addiction or desperation? Will it stop crimes of passion?

Who knows, but my guess is that, like 10:33 says, our society's underlying view of humanity, the value of every individual, the priceless spirit, is what will really reduce violent crime. We need to love ourselves and others, then we won't want to kill ourselves or others. If that is completely beyond the pale, if that will never ever happen, then how can I deny someone the security, however flimsy, of owning firearms?

Anonymous said...

The problem doesn't lie in whether you can make a functioning and reliable gun or not, using a 3DP. It lies rather in a group of psychotic dual-passport criminals who have subverted everything that America, as originally envisaged, stands for.
Rather than running and hiding from these individuals, and finding places in the legal framework which are safe from their treasonous activities, it is preferable that these people be confronted and emasculated themselves. In the case of Feinstein this might be difficult, but this is where the agenda should truly lie.
These people have genocidal intent; they have already shown how many countless millions they are prepared to brutally murder and torture and starve to death, in Mother Russia and the Ukraine, whilst all the while bleating about how many of their own were terminated in the camps; which incidentally, according to the International Red Cross, numbered fewer than 1/4 million, almost entirely dying through the mass starvation and ensuing typhus caused by Allied saturation bombing of German transport infrastructure.
Know your enemy, and confront him now.
See BroVids for an expose of their agenda.
Tim Webb.

boban Michael said...

Im so gonna get myself such a printer and make dozen copies of Coco-t

sallyho3000 said...

Dale, it is not guns that are the driving force behind gun violence in the US; it is fear, poverty, and desperation. Love your neighbor. Why's their curtains closed...? See, Canada has MORE guns, per capita than the US, yet they have LESS gun violence. News flash: The number one cause of death in homicides in the US is blunt-force trauma... Shall we sharpen everything?

Anonymous said...

I just hope this won't evolve into cyberpunk dystopia of an anarchy of the profit motive.

Also think of Tor, WikiLeaks, DarkWallet & Bitcoin.
Seems like we're heading for a new paradigm, a shift of power and a restructuring of society.
Until now it was a top-down approach of regulatory bodies that sustain society - now the bones of society are becoming algorithms - technological frameworks that work on their own, independent of human interaction. And an ever increasing power of the individual by progress in technology, heightening the impact of any intend (from good to bad ..including for example terrorist making use of biotechnology)

The future is still uncertain so it's up to us to shape it.
https://youtu.be/6vNCpGaxWno

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