Sunday, October 17, 2010

News Corp. Shuts Off Hulu Access To Cablevision Customers – And Turns It Back On

Editor's Note:  In an impressive display of internet censorship power, News Corp has been able to restrict internet access to outside providers to some of its websites.  Now that we know that this type of censoring ability exists, we can expect to see much more efforts to strangle internet service providers to comply with the media giants.  Not a good sign at all.  Also note that the following article is written by a News Corp employee so it surely has the kindest possible spin on this exercise of power.

Peter Kafka 
WSJ Digital

UPDATE: That was fast. People familiar with the situation say that News Corp. is changing tactics and will turn on access to Fox.com and Fox programming on Hulu for Cablevision’s customers. This could take a “few hours” to roll out across the Cablevision footprint, I’m told.

EARLIER:
One new twist to the Cablevision/News Corp. fight: News Corp. has cut off Cablevision subscribers’ access to its shows on Hulu, the video site joint venture, as well as on its own Fox.com

Here’s a screenshot from Fortune.com columnist Seth Weintraub, taken this afternoon when he tried to watch a Fox show on the site, which is co-owned by News Corp., Disney’s ABC and GE’s NBC Universal:


News Corp.’s comment, via Fox Networks PR guy Scott Grogin: “Fox.com and Fox content on hulu is unavailable to Cablevision subscribers.”


RELATED ARTICLE:



BE THE CHANGE! PLEASE SHARE THIS USING THE TOOLS BELOW


If you enjoy our work, please donate to keep our website going.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Let them manipulate TV all they want. Maybe the people will wake up and discover a World without lies and useless nonsense. I lived without cable for 1 year and you ain't missing nothin'. I actually went outside and talked to people...real people. NewsCorp shouldnt rock boats with holes already in them. Its great spending $80 month on a good meal with your wife, instead of lies, lies, and useless junk.

Anonymous said...

I canceled my cable service a year ago and
haven't missed it. For all the American TV
watch, an antenna is perfectly adequate. I
watch streaming video of foreign stations
for my news anyway. I canceled my subscription
to the local newspapers too. The lies and the
garbage on US main stream media used to be
just annoying but lately it has become
painful to watch. The talking heads with their
plastic smiles and concerned serious voices make
the BS hurt, it's just plan painful. I'm also
sick of screaming at the screen, yelling "tell
the truth" I hope Rupert keeps thinking the crap he broadcasts is of value because acting
like it is will just run News Corp into the
ground even faster. I red books, talk to people
and use the NET now, more and more. Good
riddance to the MSM

Anonymous said...

Cable used to be called "Pay TV" when it first came out here (Florida). The reason you paid for it was so you would have the luxury of not being bothered by commercials, and shows that didn't have parts cut out (edited to run in a specific time frame). Now, not only do they charge us way more than it's worth, but they shove commercials down our throats, and cut portions of movies and some hour-long shows so that their commercials will have all the time they need. I once recorded how much commercial time was in a particular one-hour show, and the score was 22 minutes of commercials for every hour of viewing pleasure. That meant that the one-hour show was actually 38 minutes long.

Good bye cable, dish and satellite. I don't need you.

AlysaG said...

In yet another very public dispute over cable Television costs, Cablevision and Fox are threatening to turn off weekend baseball along with all the other content accessible on Fox's 12 channels. The two businesses need to come to an agreement by midnight on Friday. Should no agreement be reached, all the channels can be turned off. The amount a business ought to be paying for content is the debate at issue. I got the information here: Cablevision chafing under Fox request for fees.

Post a Comment